Thursday, 12 December 2013

Call Center Culture puts Young Urban Indians at risk of Heart Disease

The increasingly sedentary lifestyle of young urban Indians is putting them at higher risk for heart disease, according to leading cardiologist Dr. Rajesh Rajan. Dr. Rajan pointed out at a recent conference in Bangalore (IACCCON-2013), that deaths among working young Indians (35-45 years old) due to cardiovascular disease, were three times higher than in the United States. Dr. Rajan blamed the call center culture for the dramatic increase in heart disease and diabetes. He stated that India is rapidly becoming the heart disease capital of the world.

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Thursday, 12 December 2013

New Approach to Heart Health for the Rural Poor

An expert government cardiologist to help the poor in rural districts across the entire continent of India. This is one of the ambitious proposals advocated by Dr. Rajesh Rajan at a recent high level conference in Bangalore (IACCCON-2013).

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Thursday, 12 December 2013

Young Urban Workers at Risk of Heart Disease

The increasingly sedentary lifestyle of young urban workers is putting them at higher risk for heart disease, according to leading cardiologist Dr. Rajesh Rajan. As Dr. Rajan pointed out at a recent conference in Bangalore (IACCCON-2013), deaths due to cardiovascular disease in India were three times higher than in the United States among working young people in the 35-45 age range. Dr. Rajan blamed the call center culture for the dramatic increase in heart disease and diabetes. India is rapidly becoming the heart disease capital of the world, he said. However, an increasingly sedentary lifestyle is also putting urban workers in the UAE, Europe, and North America at risk.

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Thursday, 12 December 2013

Top Doctors Provide a Mediterranean Menu for Mental Health

Britain’s Health Minister, Jeremy Hunt, has received an unusual piece of medical advice from the top doctors in Britain. The advice is contained in a letter signed by Clare Gerada, the former Chairman of the Royal College of Physicians. She and eleven distinguished colleagues urge policy makers to help the British switch from a diet high in red meat and saturated fats to a Mediterranean diet that contains plenty of vegetables and fish.

“The evidence base for the Mediterranean diet in preventing all of the chronic diseases that affect the western world is overwhelming,” they claim. The letter is signed by experts from Britain, France, Italy, Greece and the United States. They include Dr. Aseem Malhotra, a cardiology specialist at Croydon University Hospital in South London.

The experts point to a recent review of evidence which showed that people on a Mediterranean diet had better cognitive function, lower rates of cognitive decline, and less risk of Alzheimer’s disease. “Poor diet causes more diseases than a lack of physical activity, plus smoking, plus alcohol combined,” said Simon Capewell, a professor of clinical epidemiology at the University of Liverpool.

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